NEW PHYSICAL EFFECT PERMITS FACTOR-OF-TEN REDUCTION IN ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR COOLING
Advanced Materials Research Vols. 875-877 (2014) pp 1842-1846  
© (2014) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland 
doi:10.4028/www.scientific.net/AMR.875-877.1842 


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Danil B. Doubochinski - Jonathan Tennenbaum
 

Keywords: energy saving, refrigeration, cooling, atomization, nonlinear interactions, argumental interactions, Carnot cycle. 

Abstract

A revolutionary new technology for cooling and refrigeration, based on applications of nonlinear coupled oscillations to the atomization and evaporation of liquids, opens the way to order-of-magnitude reductions in the energy requirements for cooling and refrigeration in a wide range of applications. The basic principles of the new cooling method are presented, together with results of certified measurements carried out on laboratory prototypes of the new cooling process. 

Introduction 

Developing more efficient technologies for refrigeration, air conditioning, and the cooling of industrial plants, is key to saving energy and to increasing economic productivity of the world’s nations. The present paper summarizes results of research into a fundamentally new method for cooling and refrigeration, which can provide enormous increases in energy efficiency in a broad range of potential applications. The new cooling technology was made possible by theoretical and experimental discoveries in the domain of energy transformation by nonlinearly coupled oscillations [1-10], and involves new principles and new physical phenomena which are the focus of continuing research by the authors and their collaborators. 

The new cooling method uses nonlinear interactions, generated in a mixture of air and water by a combination of pulsation frequencies inside a specially-designed “reactor”, to atomize the water into droplets of 0.1 micron diameter or less. As we shall explain in more detail below, this nonlinear atomizing process requires only a very small amount of externally-applied energy, and has the extraordinary property – apparently never observed before – that it actually consumes thermal energy from the air-water medium.